Out into Open Ocean – Day 57

Sydney back to St. Peters on our way southwest. Now it’s decision time. Do we go back through the protected and very beautiful Bras d’Or Lake or by heading east into the Atlantic and then south along the rugged, less inhabited coastline? The answer is all about the weather. In good (modest waves) weather we can be more adventuresome if we want to. In bad (wind, heavy seas, heavy fog) weather we will be prudent and stay inshore. Conditions were very good so we chose to be adventuresome and take the open ocean route.

Sydney back to St. Peters on our way southwest.

Sydney back to St. Peters on our way southwest.

Along the Cape Breton Island coast east of  Glacé Bay and Flint Island going past the tip of south Port  in the open ocean.

Along the Cape Breton Island coast east of Glacé Bay and Flint Island going past the tip of south Port in the open ocean.

Looking deep into the next bay from a mile off the point.

Looking deep into the next bay from a mile off the point.

Cutting across outside a large open bay as we head for a narrow passage between the mainland and uninhabited Scaterie Island. The passage presented no problems.

Cutting across outside a large open bay as we head for a narrow passage between the mainland and uninhabited Scaterie Island. The passage presented no problems.

Here we are the St. Peters lock, just like we were a week ago. But today we have just arrived from Sydney, NS that we left 4 and 1/2 hours ago. That's 115 miles on the route we took around the outside of Cape Breton Island in the Atlantic. We'll spend the night at the marina just past the lock, get fuel, and then come back through the lock in the morning as we head southwest along the Nova Scotia coast toward Halifax.

Here we are the St. Peters lock, just like we were a week ago. But today we have just arrived from Sydney, NS that we left 4 and 1/2 hours ago. That’s 115 miles on the route we took around the outside of Cape Breton Island in the Atlantic. We’ll spend the night at the marina just past the lock, get fuel, and then come back through the lock in the morning as we head southwest along the Nova Scotia coast toward Halifax.


Comments

Out into Open Ocean – Day 57 — 4 Comments

    • Brian, yes…you are right. But just saying 1 mile per gallon is misleading to some people who do not understand some of what I wrote to Ralph in the post below this, on this page. Thanks for the comment and hope you have great boating adventures too.

      Bruno

  1. Just curious about what fuel economy you have been getting on your journey. You’ve got a lot of boat, what mpg or gph do you get on cruise, and what is your best cruise speed?

    • Hi Ralph and thanks for asking about the fuel economy. The amount of fuel you use is dependent on a number of factors such as boat type (shape, etc.), weight of the boat (which varies a lot boat to boat of the approximate same size…and also if it’s full of fuel and people and stuff or not), and how fast you are trying to go for the engines you have.

      Having said all this, to answer your questions specifically; the boat is 34.5 ‘ long and 12′ wide. It weighs 18,000 lbs. fully loaded and the 2 engines are 350 hp each…so yes, it is a lot of boat. But it also will do things comfortably that other 34′ boats or even bigger won’t be able to do or to do comfortably.

      Although our Pursuit will go 48 mph that is not cruising speed, it’s the top end speed. As to the best cruising speed, that depends on the waves. If the water is flat or up to about a 2-3 foot chop, the best cruising speed is 29-31 mph at a gph of 28.0 to 32.5 depending on wind, weight of stuff in the boat and our going with or against a current if there is one. If the seas are running at 4-6 feet then the best cruising speed is closer to 24-27 mph. Heavier seas will require a somewhat slower cruising speed, maybe 22-24 mph. Hope this helps.

      iboats’ Captain,

      Bruno

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